Purposes and Theories of Punishment

SCY1200 Introduction to Sociology 2 Semester 2 2010 School of Political and Social Inquiry South Africa Campus Monash University INTRODUCTION TO SOCIOLOGY 2 SCY1200 Semester 2 2010 1. Staff and Unit Information Unit Coordinator Associate Professor Dharma Arunachalam (Australia) Lecturer – South Africa Dr. Roseline M. Achieng’ Office # 2. 10, Block C Consulting Hours Wednesday: 10. 00hrs – 13. 00hrs Any other time by appointment only e-mail: roseline. [email protected] monash. edu Tutorial Fellows: Mrs. Jackie Horn – horn. [email protected] com Mr. Sibonilo Shozi – [email protected] com Tutors’ Offices:

Jackie Horn # 2-14, Block C Sibonilo Shozi – to be announced in class and posted on the sociology notice board 2. Unit Format Format A unit of 3 hours per week, made up of 1 x TWO hour lecture and a one hour tutorial. This subject consists of three sections: •Section 1 – Families and Relationships •Section 2 –Sociology of Health and Medicine •Section 3 – Population and Society Aims of the Unit •To build on the sociological knowledge and skills students were introduced to in the first semester in SCY1100. •To consolidate understanding of basic concepts and theories in the discipline of sociology. To further develop analytical, argumentation and critical skills. Unit Objectives By the end of this semester students are expected to: •Have a basic knowledge of major sociological concepts and theories. •Have acquired an understanding of the sociological perspective. •Have developed the fundamental library research skills necessary to complete the assessment tasks required by this subject. •Have acquired appropriate essay writing techniques and critical analytical and argumentation skills to be able to tackle second year units. 3. Lecture and Assessment Timetable

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WeekDateTopic Assessment Task 1July 19th – 23rdIntroduction 2July 26th – 30thSection 1: Families and Relationships Love, romance and dating 3August 2nd – 6th Cultural diversity and families 4August 9th – 13th Work and families 5August 16th – 20th Divorce and re-constituted families 6August 23rd – 27th Section 2: Sociology of Health and Medicine What is health and health care? Essay 1: Due on Aug 25 7August 30th – 3rd Sep. From ‘sick role’ to ‘surveillance medicine’ 8Sept. 6th – 10th The illness experience 9Sept. 13th – 17th Challenges in health and medicine 10Sept. 0th – 24th Section 3: Population and Society Global Population Growth Sept. 27th – Oct. 1st MID SEMESTER BREAK 11Oct. 4th – 8thImmigrationEssay 2: Due on Oct. 6 12Oct. 11th – 15th Childbearing in Australia/South Africa and Africa 13Oct. 18th – 22nd Review. Exam preparation 4. Assessment •2 x Short Essays @ 30% each60% •2 hour exam (3 short essay questions) at end of semester30% •Class/Tutorial attendance and participation10% _____ Total 100% Short Essays You are required to research and write two short essays which need to be handed in by the following due dates and in your tutorial groups.

Due Dates:Essay 1: Due by August 25 Essay 2: Due by October 6 Length: 1500 words Plus or minus 100 words. Essays longer than 1600 words will be penalised by 10%. Note: The Reference list does not form part of the required word length. Submission of Essays: Short essays are to be handed over to your tutor in your respective tutorial group. Attach a First Year Sociology Cover Sheet with all details filled in. Remember to make a copy of your assignment before submitting it. Essays will not be accepted as email attachments.

Marked essays will be returned by your Tutor in the Tutorials. Late Submissions: Work submitted after the due date without a formal extension or application for Special Consideration will be treated as follows: •A 5% penalty applies for the first day of the missed deadline. •A subsequent penalty of 2% per day will be applied for the next 13 calendar days after the due date (including Saturdays and Sundays). •No assignment can be accepted after more than fourteen calendar days except in exceptional circumstances and in consultation with your lecturer or tutor. 2 Day Extensions

Students must register a request via e-mail to their unit coordinator (copy it to their Tutor) before the assignment deadline and tick an ‘extension’ box on the cover-sheet of their assignment. Eligibility Students may be granted a 2 day extension for reasons which would not require any documentation: •short-term illness, •clashing deadlines, •unforeseen employment obligations, or family circumstances. Other Extensions: All requests for an extension of an assessment deadline must be submitted to the unit co-ordinator. Requests must be received BEFORE the due date of the assessment.

Extensions will normally only be granted to students who can support their request with appropriate documentation. The undertaking of regular paid work does NOT in itself constitute adequate grounds for the granting of extensions. It is the duty of students to contact unit co-ordinator in adequate time for a response and to forward all supporting documentation. The student should have their coversheet signed and dated by the unit co-ordinator and then attach it to their submission. Alternatively, the co-ordinator may approve the extension through email, a copy of which should be attached to the essay.

You DO NOT have an extension until the coversheet has been signed and dated by the unit co-ordinator or approved via email. Essay Writing: Essay writing and oral presentations will be a component of your professional working life, whatever field you choose. Writing for the workplace requires skills in using both formal and technical language, logical and analytical thinking, and good research techniques. It’s wise to gain those skills now. Organise your work logically. Prepare an outline or plan before you begin. Make sure that there is a flow between paragraphs, with a clear connection between one idea and the next.

Do not use subheadings for such short essays. If in doubt, talk to your tutor. Each essay should be clear, logical and use evidence or examples to support the points made. Material used should be correctly referenced and a list of references included at the end. Essays will be assessed for grammar, expression, clarity of argument, use of evidence and proper referencing. Use Australian examples where possible. Preparing a well-argued, well-researched essay requires serious reflection about the question. In this task, consult relevant academic references, not simply internet information-based websites.

Start with the set reading, and then use your library search skills to find additional material. Useful references and research sites are listed on pages 15-16 of this subject guide. Writing improves with practice. It also improves with reading. Learn to take good notes while reading source material – another important skill to accomplish at this stage. Underline or highlight any photocopied or downloaded material. As far as possible use recent texts and take care to note the exact reference and page numbers as you are required to reproduce them correctly in assignments.

If you need help with locating sources please see the Library Information Desk. If you need any additional information or any additional guidance with the assignments, please see or email your tutor at the earliest opportunity. i) Essay Format For hints on essay writing in Sociology see the library tutorial site: http://www. monash. edu. au/lls/sif/Tutorials/Subjects/Sociology/Writing_in_Soc/writing_in_soc. html. Germov and Poole (2006) Chapter 10 also has useful information and advice. For information on correctly setting out references, see: Monash University Language and Learning Study Site at: http://www. monash. du. au/lls/sif/sif. htm Presentation •Typed, 12 point, Times New Roman, with 1. 5 spacing •Include page numbering •Leave sufficient space in the margins (e. g. 30mm) for comments •Take care with spelling, grammar, referencing and equity issues (e. g. non-sexist and non-racist language) •Number Tables and Figures (e. g. Fig 1, Table 1), with relevant title and source. List Figure title above, and Table title beneath table. Use current and local statistics where available. Spelling and Punctuation: If you have any problems with grammar, spelling or punctuation, seek advice from Monash’s online tutorial (see below).

Do not simply rely on spell check as some words have American spelling. Change American spelling and punctuation to Australian forms, e. g. : neighbour not neighbor; organise not organize; labour not labor unless you are referring to the Australian Labor Party. Avoid SMS-style expressions and abbreviations. Spell out acronyms. Correctly use apostrophes and avoid common spelling mistakes, e. g. affect/effect; it’s/its; practice/practise; their/there; where/were. ii) How will my essay be assessed? Each essay should be clear, logically developed, and use supporting academic evidence and examples to support points being made.

Plagiarism must be avoided. Material used should be appropriately referenced and included in a ‘References Cited’ list at the end. When marking your essays, your tutors will be looking for these things. In particular, they will be evaluating your work with reference to issues such as: Content ?Clear definitions/explanations of terminology ?Argument linked to topic ?Points made supported by academic references ?Relevance of examples used (Australian examples where possible) Structure ?Use of subheadings (if required) ?Logical organisation and flow of material (especially between paragraphs) Style Clear writing style ?Formal academic language, expression and style ?Attention given to expression, grammar, punctuation and spelling Referencing ?Appropriate referencing system for both ‘in-text’ referencing and reference list, paying particular attention to electronic referencing. Citations Paraphrase or summarise an author’s ideas, citing texts where necessary. Quote only information which highlights or reinforces the points you are raising. Ensure that quotations have page numbers unless citing from an internet site. e. g. : Paraphrasing: Education is an important factor in socialisation (Giddens, 2001).

In his thesis on social stratification Giddens (2001) outlines that… According to Newman (2004), socialisation affects… Quoting:Giddens (2001:174) states: ‘The dominance of the traditional nuclear family…’ [Can also use: (2001, p. 174)] Giddens (2001:282) maintains that ‘social stratification is…’ According to Newman (2004:328): ‘All societies, past and resent…’ Indented Quotes: Indent quotes longer than 2. 5 lines (approx. ). Such citations do not need ‘inverted commas’. But ‘quotation marks’ are essential when quoting within the body of the essay. Cite author(s), date and page, e. g. :

According to Holmes, Hughes and Julian (2003:503), socialisation is: A process by which individuals are enculturated into the dominant values and belief systems of the society in which they live…[I]t is a process that continues throughout life. Reference List: In the References section cite only those texts you actually refer to in the essay, not all the texts you may have used in your background research. Ensure consistency within citations, particularly the use of italics and plain text, capitals or small letters for titles, order of date, as well as publisher and place of publication.

If you need help with referencing, check the Style Manual for Authors, Editors and Printers (2002) in the library or Monash’s Guide to Citations and Referencing: http://www. lib. monash. edu/tutorials/citing/ Figures and Tables: Ensure Figures or Tables are numbered, eg, Figure 1; Table 1; Figure 2; Table 2; and sourced. List Figure title above, and Table title beneath table. Note: Use current and local statistics where available. SCY1200: Introduction to Sociology 11, 2010 ESSAY MARKING SHEET Student Name____________________________________________ Essay No. :

MarksExcellentVery GoodSoundPassNeeds Improving 1. Relevance of answer to the question 55 2. Content of material; Development of original argument 3. Evidence and/or examples to support the argument; Use of appropriate theory or perspective 4. Clear introduction, incl. aim & direction 15 5. Conclusion – Clear summary/synthesis of major issues Subtotal70 6 Essay Structure: Logical development of ideas 20 7 Clarity in expression, grammar & syntax 8 Links & flow between paragraphs 9 Spelling & Punctuation, Apostrophes 10 Presentation of essay, page nos. & 1. 5 spacing

Subtotal20 11 Appropriate in-text references 10 12 Referencing: consistent & academically appropriate Comments: Mark: _________/100 Criteria for Grading Assessed Work HDHigh Distinction (excellent)80-100% •outstanding command of expression and logical argument in a skillfully structured essay •superior evaluation and integration of this existing literature •evidence of significant insight and original thought in dealing with the critical issues •identifies very comprehensive range of concepts and information •superior conceptualisation, interrelation and evaluation.

DDistinction (very good)70-79% •essay well-written, logically argued and generally well-structured •evaluation and integration of the existing literature is very sound without being outstanding •reasonable insight and some evidence of original thought in dealing with the critical issues •identifies a comprehensive range of concepts/information •interrelates important concepts/information

CCredit (Sound)60-69% •generally competently written but some problems exist in the logical organisation of the text •shows that the student has read more extensively than the basic references •provides a mostly descriptive rather than evaluative/critical coverage of the issues and literature •evidence of problems with conceptualisation, interrelating and assessment PPass50-59% the paper is just adequate in its syntax and expression and shows flaws in the structuring of logical arguments •adequate coverage of literature but relies too heavily on it to provide the substance of the essay in terms of ideas and arguments •some evidence of insight into the issues or the literature •conceptualisation is often superficial and demonstrates little understanding of the processes of interrelating or critical evaluation NFail (needs improvement)0-49% the work is poorly written; logical structure is seriously flawed •inadequate coverage of the necessary literature, and information supporting arguments/conclusions is either insufficient or non-existent •little or no evidence of insight into the ideas or themes of the topic •work demonstrates weak or no understanding of the literature and critical issues •plagiarism 5. Marking Scale •High DistinctionHD80+ •DistinctionD70-79 •CreditC60-69 •PassP50-59 •FailNLess than 50 5. Examination There will be a 2 hour examination in the formal examination period at the end of the semester.

The exam is made up of three short essay questions drawn from material presented in lectures, tutorials and weekly reading. 6. Sociology Textbooks Prescribed Textbook Van Krieken, R. Habibis, D. Smith, P. Hutchins, B. Haralambos, M. Holborn, M (2006) Sociology: Themes and Perspectives (3rd ed) Frenchs Forest: Pearson Longman Available from the campus bookshop. Recommended Texts Giddens A. , 2009, Sociology, 6th edition, Polity Press, Cambridge. Newman D. M. , 2006, Sociology: Exploring the Architecture of Everyday Life, 6th edition, Sage, Thousand Oaks, CA. Supplementary References

Abercrombie N. , Hill S. , & Turner B. , 2000, Penguin Dictionary of Sociology, Penguin Books, London/New York. Beilharz P. & Hogan T. , Eds, 2002, Social, Self, Global Culture: An Introduction to Sociological Ideas, 2nd edition, Oxford University Press, South Melbourne, Vic. Chapters 3, 22, 23, 25. Bessant J. & Watts R. , 2002, Sociology Australia, 2nd edition, Allen & Unwin, Crows Nest, NSW. Chapters 8, 11, 15. Haralambos M. & Holborn M. , 2004, Sociology: Themes and Perspectives, 6th edition, Collins, London. Chapters 13, 15, Holmes D. , Hughes K. & Julian R. 2003, Australian Sociology: A Changing Society, Pearson Education Australia, Frenchs Forest, NSW. Chs 4 & 14. Jureidini R. & Poole M. , Eds, 2003, Sociology: Australian Connections, 3rd edition, Allen & Unwin, Sydney. Chapters 6, 9, 16, 18, 19, 21. Many useful sociology books can be found in the 301+ shelves in the Library. 7. Attendance: Lectures and Tutorials In order to complete the unit satisfactorily you are required to attend the lecture and one tutorial each week. Lectures The lectures are designed to give you an overview of the subject. It is important that you attend all lectures.

Lectures will draw attention to the major issues and concepts and be a guide for further reading and tutorial discussion. The questions for the end of semester exam will be drawn directly from the lectures. To maximise the benefit of lectures and tutorials you are expected to do the set reading for each week. Tutorials Tutorials are extremely important and attendance is compulsory. Failure to attend tutorials will affect your Attendance and Participation mark (6 out of 10 marks if at least 10 tutorials ; 7-9 tutorials 4 marks; 4-6 tutorials 2 marks; 1-3 tutorials 1 mark).

You are required to take part in class discussions on the various topics. This will also form part of your Attendance and Participation mark (4 out of 10 marks). Tutors Your tutor is your most important contact person. If you are unable to attend a tutorial, you need to email the tutor beforehand, as well as provide evidence of medical or other extenuating circumstances that may have prevented your attendance. 10. Plagiarism Essay writing is an essential part of the academic learning process and a vital medium through which staff can assess your understanding of the subject.

The essay must therefore be your own work. By all means use the work of others for your research, but, and this is most important, when you quote or paraphrase the explanations of others, you must acknowledge your sources in full. In preparing your essay, you may seek the help of your tutor. Make an appointment or visit them during their consultation times (times found on tutors’ office door). You might also like to discuss the topic with fellow students – with a view to deepening your knowledge and sorting out your ideas. However, the final essay must be written by you in your own words.

Plagiarism occurs when students fail to acknowledge that ideas have been borrowed or when the paraphrasing of a passage from a reference is too close to the original reference material. Specifically it occurs when: •Phrases and passages are used verbatim without quotation marks or indentation, even if you have referenced them, that is, where they are written as if they are part of your own discussion, and a distinction is not made to clearly indicate that this phrase or paragraph or sentence is not your own; •An author’s work is paraphrased and presented without a citation; •Other students’ essays are copied; Essays are written in conjunction with other students (without prior permission); •An essay has already been submitted for assessment in another course at Monash University or elsewhere; •Material is downloaded from the Internet and incorporated into the essay without acknowledgement. Accidental plagiarism can occur where paragraphs or slabs of text are taken from one or more references (often without quotation marks) and connected by linking sentences to make up the essay. Even if the borrowed text is referenced by author, date, and page or website, the substance of the paper is not the student’s own work or ideas.

Plagiarism is the most serious breach of university rules and academic integrity. Essays found to be plagiarised are given a zero mark. Students may also find themselves subject to disciplinary action by the faculty and university. The Faculty of Arts Plagiarism policy can be found at http://www. arts. monash. edu. au/current/policy/plagiarism-policy. php If you have any questions regarding this please contact your unit co-ordinator. The Monash University Library has a tutorial for students regarding plagiarism. We encourage students to access it at:http://www. lib. monash. edu/tutorials/citing/plagiarism. tml Avoiding Plagiarism: The following example illustrates what is meant by plagiarism. Original Text Plagiarism Many critics worry about violence on television, most out of fear that it stimulates viewers to violent or aggressive acts. Our research, however, indicates that the consequences of experiencing TV’s symbolic of violence may be much more far-reaching. Critics worry about television violence because they fear it stimulates viewers to violent or aggressive action. The researchers found that the consequences of experiencing TV’s symbolic violent world many be much more serious. 11. Useful Websites

An increasing number of resources are available through the Internet. These include specialised electronic Sociology journals and a large number of individual homepages devoted to specific topics and groups. Note: Referencing of Internet resources should be formatted to enable the source to be easily accessed. However, be aware that while there are many information sites, only authoritative sources (e. g. academic journals, NGO and sociological studies/reports, government publications, reputable newspapers, university sites, research institutions) are appropriate for citing in an academic paper.

If in doubt, contact your tutor. Textbook Sites Website for van Krieken et al. Sociology. Themes and Perspectives, 3rd Edition. http://www. pearsoned. com. au/vankrieken Website for: Giddens A, 2001, Sociology, 4th edition, Polity Press, Cambrige. http://www. polity. co. uk/giddens/web_links. htm Website for: Newman D. M. , 2006, Sociology: Exploring the Architecture of Everyday Life, 6th edition, Sage, Thousand Oaks, CA. Additional readings for each chapter are found at: http://www. pineforge. com/newman6study/index. htm Useful Sociology Sites

Listed here is a range of good sites to help you with research and links for tutorial discussions and short essays. Social Science Hub – Sociology http://www. sshub. com/soc. htm SOSIG-Social Science Information Gateway http://sosig. ac. uk/roads/subject-listing/World-cat/sociol. html Sociological Tour through Cyberspace http://www. trinity. edu/~mkearl/index. html Sociology Online http://www. sociologyonline. co. uk SocioSite http://www. pscw. uva. nl/sociosite/about. html Yahoo Social Science – Sociology (Often a useful starting point) http://dir. yahoo. om/Social_Science/Sociology/ Dead Sociologists Index (Important theorists) http://www2. pfeiffer. edu/%7Elridener/DSS/INDEX. HTML Glossary of Sociological Terms http://www. soci. canterbury. ac. nz/resources/glossary/index. shtml Online Dictionary of the Social Sciences http://bitbucket. icaap. org/ Other Sites of Interest Australian Broadcasting Corporation (ABC, especially programs on RN like ‘Life Matters’, ‘Media Report’) http://www. abc. net. au/rn Australian Bureau of Statistics http://www. abs. gov. au/ United Nations Population Division http://www. n. org/esa/population/ United Nations Population Division publications http://www. un. org/esa/population/publications/publications. htm BBC (See in-depth reports on social issues) http://news. bbc. co. uk/2/hi/in_depth/default. stm The Australian Sociological Association (Go to ‘Resources’ for relevant web links): http://tasa. org. au/ How to Study Sites: Monash Language and Learning Online: Check the Monash online study centre for guides on reading, writing, note taking, giving oral presentations, study skills, and preparing for exams. http://www. onash. edu. au/lls/llonline/ See also ‘Other Resources’ for useful web guides on grammar and writing: http://www. monash. edu. au/lls/llonline/grammar/other-resources. xml Monash Library Useful site on how to do research using the Internet http://www. lib. monash. edu. au/vl/www/wwwcon. htm 12. Your Involvement in this Unit The key to successful understanding of the unit themes, as well as to your growth as a critical analytical thinker in your university studies, is your immersion in and interaction with a wide range of reading matter in the discipline.

This has the effect of developing a baseline knowledge of the issues, debates and theoretical perspectives from which you can expand and create your own conceptual frameworks, arguments and relationships. This not only enables you to very ably tackle the tasks expected of you in this unit but ensures that you gain a level of enjoyment and satisfaction in your studies, denied the individual who skims the surface and never actually takes the plunge. In addition to reviewing the major texts (van Krieken et al. , Giddens; Newman, etc. , it is an excellent idea to peruse newspapers and news magazines (many in the Library and online) for useful sources of information about current issues. Save relevant articles and develop your own resource base for tutorial discussions and written assignments. Outline of Lectures, Tutorials and Weekly Readings Week 1 Introduction Lecturer: Dr. Roseline M. Achieng’ Section 1: FAMILIES AND RELATIONSHIPS Week 2 Love, romance and dating This lecture provides an overview of the main theories used to study families and relationships and an outline of historical change in the way we experience love, romance and courtship.

Tutorial Questions 1. What are the main differences between pre-modern, modern and late-modern families? 2. What social factors have most influenced change in relationships and families over the past 50 years? Key reading Van Krieken R, Habibis D, Smith P, Hutchins B, Haralambos M and Holborn (2006) Sociology: Themes and Perspectives, 3rd Edition, , Frenchs Forest: Pearson Longman, pp77-85 & pp116-119. Additional readings Lindsay J and Dempsey (2009) ‘Chapter 4’ in Families, Relationships and Intimate Life Oxford University Press, South Melbourne, pp50-68.

Giddens A (2009) ‘Families’ in Sociology, Polity, Cambridge, pp. 327 – 331 Week 3: Cultural diversity and families In this lecture we examine the ways in which families and relationships are shaped by cultural background and identity. We explore the differences in the way families are organised according to ethnic background, sexual preference and social class. Tutorial questions 1. What are the main challenges for people who have ‘non heterosexual’ relationships and families? 2. Are you aware of class differences in expectations or understandings about family life? Describe some of these differences. 3.

In what ways does migration and colonisation impact on family relationships? Key reading Van Krieken, R. Habibis, D. Smith, P. Hutchins, B. Haralambos, M. Holborn, M (2006) Sociology: Themes and Perspectives, 3rd edition, Frenchs Forest: Pearson Longman, pages 88-96 and 240-253. Additional readings Baldassar L, Baldock C and Wilding R (2007) ‘Introduction’ Families caring across borders: Migration, ageing and transnational caregiving, Palgrave Macmillan, Houndsmills, pp. Weeks, J Donovan C and Heaphy B (1999) ‘Everyday experiments: Narratives of non-heterosexual relationships’ in Silva, E. B. and Smart, C. eds) The new family? Sage, London. Week 4:Work and families Gender is a central organising principle of both the paid labour market and domestic labour within families. This week we examine both paid and unpaid labour and the interactions between these domains. Tutorial Questions 1. The ways in which men and women engage with unpaid or paid work is often framed as ‘choices’ or ‘preferences’. What are some of the broader social, economic or cultural factors that influence the choices we make? 2. Should parents be encouraged to work part-time as a way of managing the demands of paid and unpaid labour?

Does it offer the best of both worlds or the worst? Key reading Van Krieken, R. Habibis, D. Smith, P. Hutchins, B. Haralambos, M. Holborn, M (2006) Sociology: Themes and Perspectives, 3rd edition, Frenchs Forest: Pearson Longman, pages 88-96, 103-106 & 187-190. Additional readings Hochschild A (1990) ‘Preface’ and ‘Marriage in the stalled revolution’ in The Second Shift, Avon Books, New York, pages vii-xvii & 11-21 Pocock, B (2005) ‘Mothers: The more things change, the more they stay the same’ in Poole, M (ed. ) Family: Changing families, changing times, Allen and Unwin, Sydney.

Singleton, A (2005) ‘Fathers: More than breadwinners? in Poole, M (ed. ) Family: Changing families, changing times, Allen and Unwin, Sydney. Week 5: Divorce and re-constituted families In the final week of this module we look at the implications of what Beck-Gernsheim calls the ‘normalisation of divorce’. We look at the way family relationships are re-made after divorce and consider the implications for the future of families and relationships. Tutorial Questions 1. How does experiencing parents’ divorce in childhood influence young people’s expectations about marriage and relationships? 2.

Does divorce demonstrate lack of commitment to family life? Key reading Van Krieken, R. Habibis, D. Smith, P. Hutchins, B. Haralambos, M. Holborn, M (2006) in Sociology: Themes and Perspectives, 3rd edition, Frenchs Forest: Pearson Longman, pages 106-120. Additional readings Beck-Gernsheim, E (2002) ‘When divorce becomes normal’ in Reinventing the family: In search of new lifestyles (translated by Camiller P), Polity, Cambridge (Chapter 2). Hughes, Kate 2005 ‘The adult children of divorce: Pure relationships and family values? ’ Journal of Sociology, vol. 41: 69 – 86. Essay 1: Families and Relationships

DUE: On August 25 Men’s and women’s roles in the nuclear family are often portrayed in the media as natural and universal. How does studying the history of families in the African context challenge this view? Or In what ways does cultural background and identity shape everyday life in families? Discuss either racial and ethnic differences, class differences or sexual preference differences. Word Length: 1500 words (plus or minus 100 words) Essays longer than 1600 words will be penalised by 10%. The Essay must be handed over to your tutor on the day of your tutorial class. Note: Before you submit your Essay: Proof read your paper for spelling and grammatical errors •Ensure your referencing is accurate and consistent throughout the whole paper •Check the guidelines for submission on pages 5-6 of this outline Section 2: Sociology of Health and Medicine The aim of this module is to introduce you to sociological perspectives on health and medicine. Sociology has played a central role in the investigation of the social aspects of health care in contemporary societies. Sociologists have explored: the illness experience; the organisation of health care; changes in the medical professions; the clinical encounter; to name a few concerns.

In this module you will be introduced to these and other aspects of the sociology of health and medicine. Tutorial Question: Identify and discuss examples of these models of health: Disease model Social justice model Subjective model Consumer model Risk model Why are sociologists interested in health and medicine? Key reading Aggleton, P. (1995) ‘Defining health’ in Health, London: Routledge, page 1-24. Van Krieken, et al (2006) ‘Health’ in Sociology: Themes and perspectives, 3rd edition, Frenchs Forest: Pearson Longman, pages 365 to 372. Additional readings Barry, A. and Yuill, C. 2002) ‘The sociology of health and illness: explaining and theorising’ in Understanding health: a sociological introduction (London: Sage), pages 3-16. Blaxter, M. (2004) ‘How is health defined’ in Health (Cambridge: Polity), pages 4-25. Bloom, S. (2005) ‘The origins: medicine as a social science, public health and social medicine’ in Scambler, G. ed. , Medical Sociology: major themes in health and social welfare (Abdingdon: Routledge), pages 15-30. Nettleton, S (2006) ‘Introduction: The changing domains of the sociology of health and illness’ in The sociology of health and illness, 2nd edition (Cambridge: Polity), pages 1-12.

Wilkinson, R. (1996) ‘Health becomes a social science’ in Unhealthy societies: The afflictions of inequality (London: Routledge), pages 13-28 Tutorial Question: What is meant by ‘sick role’, ‘medicalisation’, ‘surveillance medicine’? Identify and discuss an example of each. Key reading Armstrong, D. (1995), ‘The rise of surveillance medicine’, Sociology of Health and Illness, 17, 3, 393-404. Van Krieken, et al (2006) ‘Health’ in Sociology: Themes and perspectives, 3rd edition, Frenchs Forest: Pearson Longman, pages 350-361. Additional readings Barry, A. and Yuill, C. 2008) ‘Medical power and knowledge’ in Understanding the sociology of health: An introduction ( London: Sage), pages 34-51. Nettleton, S. (2000), ‘Governing the risky self: how to become healthy, wealthy and wise’, in Petersen, A. and Bunton, R. (eds. ), Foucault: Health and Medicine (London: Routledge), pages 207-222. White, K. (2009) ‘Parsons, American sociology of medicine and the sick role’ in An introduction to the sociology of health and illness (London: Sage), pages 104-118. Foucault, M. (1991) ‘The politics of health in the Eighteenth Century’ in P.

Rabinow, ed. , (London: Penguin), pages 273-289. Tutorial Question: Why do sociologists explore the illness experience? What is an illness narrative? How can narratives be therapeutic? Key reading Hyden, L. (1997) ‘Illness and narrative’, Sociology of health and medicine, 19(1), 48-69. Squire, C. (2007) ‘Living positively: religious and moral narratives of HIV’ in HIV in South Africa: Talking about the big thing (London: Routledge). Additional reading Bury, M. (2001), ‘Illness narratives: fact or fiction? ‘ Sociology of Health and Illness, 23, 3, 263-285. Good, B. 2008 [1994]) ‘The narrative representation of illness’ in Medicine, rationality and experience: An anthropological perspective (Cambridge: University of Cambridge), pages 135 to 165. Greenhalgh, T. (2006) ‘Stories of illness’ in What seems to be the trouble? Stories in illness and healthcare (Oxford: Radcliffe Publishing), pages 3-15. Sontag, S. (1991 [1977]) Illness as metaphor/AIDS and its metaphors (Penguin: London). Tutorial Question: How are social inequalities reflected in health? What are the big challenges for the future of health and medicine? Key reading Bury, M. 2008) ‘New dimensions of health care organisation; in Wainright D. ed. , A sociology of health (London: Sage), pages 151-172. Van Krieken, et al (2006) ‘Health’ in Sociology: Themes and perspectives, 3rd edition, Frenchs Forest: Pearson Longman, pages 379-384. Additional readings Beck, U. , and Beck-Gernshien, E. ( 2002) ‘Health and responsibility in the age of genetic technology’ in Individualisation: Institutionalised individualism and its social consequences (London: Sage), 139-150. Blaxter, M. (2000) ‘Class, time and biography’ in Williams, S. , Gabe, J. and Calnan, M. ds, Health, medicine and society: Key theories, future agendas (London: Routledge), pages 27-50. Macintyre, S. , Hunt, K. and Sweeting, H. (2004) ‘Gender differences in health: are things as simple as they seem? ’ in Bury, M and Gabe, J. eds, The sociology of health and illness: A reader (London: Routledge), pages 161-175. Nettleton, S (2006) ‘Social inequalities and health status’ in The sociology of health and illness, 2nd edition (Cambridge: Polity), pages 169-202. Turner, B. (2004) ‘The new medical sociology’ in The new medical sociology (New York: W. W. Norton & Company), pages 270-313.

Essay 2: Sociology of Health and Medicine DUE: On October 6 “Health is a social phenomenon. ” Explain what is meant by this statement with reference to two (2) of the following themes: Models of health (ie disease model, social justice model, subjective model, consumer model, risk model); Power (ie sick role, medicalisation, surveillance medicine); Illness narrative; Inequalities and future challenges. Word Length: 1500 words (plus or minus 100 words) Essays longer than 1600 words will be penalised by 10%. The Essay must be handed over to your tutor in your respective tutorial class. Note: Before you submit your Essay: Proof read your paper for spelling and grammatical errors •Ensure your referencing is accurate and consistent throughout the whole paper •Check the guidelines for submission on pages 5-6 of this outline Section 3: Population and Society Many of us are unaware of the enormous impact of population growth and composition on our daily lives. World population is projected to increase from about just over 6 billion today to about 9 billion by 2050. Most of this increase will occur in the developing world, but many countries in the western developed world are expected to face population decline.

This section of the unit looks at what is happening to national and world population sizes and structures, why it is happening and what the potential consequences are to individuals and groups. In lectures and tutorials we will deal with such questions as: when will the world population size stabilize? Why will most of the future population growth occur in the poor nations? What are the environmental implications of increased population size? Can immigration provide a sustainable solution for the slowing of population growth in Australia? Why are Australian women and men not having enough children?

What should the society and state do to maintain the current population level in Australia? How different is the African case of immigration from the Australian case? How do African states contribute to immigration? Is Africa gaining from Immigration? Week 10: Global Population Growth Tutorial Questions World population is projected to increase to 9 billion by 2050. How can we increase the living standard in the developing world without causing adverse environmental consequences? Discuss potential social institutional adjustments, consumption patterns, relocation of population and other ossible adjustments. Key reading Giddens A. 2009, Sociology, 6th edition, Polity Press, Cambridge. Chapter 11, pp. 564 – 568. Newman D. M. , 2006, Sociology: Exploring the Architecture of Everyday Life, 6th edition, Sage, Thousand Oaks, CA, Chapter 13. Further readings Weeks, John R. 2005. Population: An Introduction to Concepts and Issues, Belmont, CA : Thomson Wadsworth Learning. Chapter 1 United Nations 1999. The World at Six Billion, ESA/P/WP. 154, October 12. (downloadable from: http://www. un. org/esa/population/publications/publications. htm) Hugo, Graeme 1999. Six Billion and Counting: Global Population Trends at the Turn of the Century”, People and Place Vol. 7, No. 2, pp. 11-18. Preston, Samuel 1994. Population and the Environment, IUSSP Distinguished Lecture Series on Population and Development, International Conference on Population and Development, Liege. Week 11: Immigration Tutorial Question The current African population is a migrant one. Is immigration desirable? Why? Frame the discussion around the pros and cons of key demographic scenario. Key readings Giddens A. , 2006, Sociology, 5th edition, Polity Press, Cambridge. Pp. 18-430 Newman D. M. , 2006, Sociology: Exploring the Architecture of Everyday Life, 6th edition, Sage, Thousand Oaks, CA, Chapter 13. Additional reading Weeks, John R. 2005. Population: An Introduction to Concepts and Issues, Belmont, CA : Thomson Wadsworth Learning. Chapter 4. Week 12: Childbearing in Australia Tutorial Questions Fertility is high in Africa in comparison to Australia. Why is fertility high in Africa? Is it desirable to reduce it? Why is fertility low in Australia? Is it desirable to increase it? Focus the discussion on social institutions, and social values and norms.

Key readings Giddens A. , 2006, Sociology, 5th edition, Cambridge, Polity Press. Chapter 13 Giddens A. , 2009, Sociology 6th edition, Cambridge, Polity Press, 564 – 573 Van Krieken et al. (2006) Sociology: Themes and perspectives (3rd edition), Sydney: Pearson Education. Pp. 97-102; pp. 265-270. Further Readings Kippen, Rebecca 2000. ‘Australia’s Population in 2000: The Way We are and the Ways We Might Have Been’, People and Place Vol. 8, No. 3, pp. 10-17. McDonald, Peter 2001. ‘Work-family Policies are the Right Approach to the Prevention of Low Fertility’, People and Place Vol. 9, No. 3, pp. 17-27.

McDonald, Peter and Kippen, Rebecca nd. The Impact of Immigration on the Ageing of Australia’s Population, Discussion Paper, Department of Immigration and Multicultural Affairs, Canberra. Merlo, Rosangela and Rowland, Don 2000. ‘The Prevalence of Childlessness in Australia’, People and Place Vol. 8. No. 2, pp. 21-32. Ruddock, Philip 1999. ‘Population Options for Australia’, People and Place Vol. 7, No. 1, pp. 1-6. Issues in Social Science Research Week 13 Exam Review Tutorial Question Can Immigration provide a sustainable solution for the changing demographic composition of Africa and issues around this?

Discuss the social, economic and environmental implications of this issue. Key Readings Giddens A. , 2001, Sociology, 4th edition, Cambridge, Polity Press. Chapter 20 Punch, Keith F. 1998. Introduction to Social Research, London, Sage Publications. Chapter 2. School of Political and Social Inquiry Policy Document School Policies on Student Work The following information is in accordance with Faculty and University policies. It has been developed and passed by the PSI Teaching Committee and endorsed by PSI Executive. June 2005 The policy includes the following: •Submission of Assessment Assessment Feedback •Retention of Exam •Extensions •Penalties •Special Consideration •Plagiarism •Review and Remarking of Work Submission of Assessment Policy Written work should be submitted before 5pm on the stated due date. Students MUST retain a hard copy of all work submitted. All submitted work must be accompanied with the approved discipline coversheet available outside the PSI office at Clayton and the Faculty of Arts Office at Caulfield and signed by the student. Written work submitted through WebCT does not require a coversheet unless otherwise specified. Process

Clayton: written work should be submitted to the appropriate submission box directly outside the School office at Clayton. DO NOT place them in staff mail boxes Caulfield: written work should be submitted to the submission box located in the door of the Arts Faculty office at Caulfield. Assessment feedback Policy Unless otherwise specified, for all assessment apart from centrally run examinations, students who submit assessment by the due date can normally expect to receive feedback within three semester weeks. Process This does not include assessment with approved extensions or that which is handed in after the due date.

Retention of Exams Policy All student examinations and uncollected assessment will be kept in a locked environment by the unit co-ordinator for six months after the notification of results. Process After six months exams and uncollected assessment will be disposed of confidentially. Extensions Policy All requests for an extension of an assessment deadline must be submitted to the unit co-ordinator (or specified member of teaching staff) who needs to sign and date the assessment coversheet provided at the Caulfield Faculty of Arts office and at the PSI office at Clayton. Requests must be received BEFORE the due date of the assessment.

Extensions will normally only be granted to students who can support their request with appropriate documentation. The undertaking of regular paid work does NOT in itself constitute adequate grounds for the granting of extensions, nor does the fact of having other assessment tasks due or end of semester exams. Process It is the duty of students to contact unit co-ordinators in adequate time for a response and to forward all supporting documentation. The student should have their coversheet signed and dated by the unit co-ordinator and then attach it to their submission.

You DO NOT have an extension until the coversheet has been signed and dated by the unit co-ordinator. Penalties For all assignments of 1,000 words or more handed in after the due date and without an agreed extension, a five percent penalty applies for the first day of the missed deadline. After that, a subsequent penalty of 2% per day will be applied for the next thirteen calendar days after the due date (including Saturdays and Sundays). No assignment can be accepted after more than fourteen calendar days except in exceptional circumstances and in consultation with your lecturer or tutor.

If students face a significant illness or serious issue, it may be that Special Consideration is warranted. Staff are under no obligation to provide written comments or corrections to assignments that are handed in late and without extension. Special Consideration Policy The objective of the University Special Consideration policy is to enable student claims for special consideration for specific assessment tasks or coursework units to be evaluated in a fair, reasonable and consistent manner throughout the university.

The Monash University Policy on Special Consideration is as follows: ‘A candidate whose work during a teaching period or whose performance in an examination or other assessment has been affected by illness or other serious cause may apply in writing for special consideration by the examiners or board of examiners concerned. Such serious causes include: •serious illness or psychological condition – e. g. hospital admission, serious injury, severe asthma, severe anxiety or depression.

Does not include minor illness such as a mild cold. •loss or bereavement – e. g. death of a close family member, family relationship breakdown. •hardship/trauma – e. g. victim of crime, sudden loss of income or employment, severe disruption to domestic arrangements. An application for special consideration must be accompanied by appropriate documentation and evidence from a qualified practitioner. Special consideration policies and procedures should apply across the entire grade distribution, not just at the pass/fail boundary.

Students should be informed that an application for special consideration ensures that the relevant board of examiners or delegated authority takes into account the case made when determining either a final outcome, or granting additional assessment or a deferred examination. Students should be informed of the eligibility conditions, principles and procedures, and potential outcomes for special consideration applications. Notes 1. Travelling overseas is not, by itself, considered “serious cause” and as such the Teaching Committee agreed that students should not ordinarily receive Deferred Examinations for this reason alone.

The examinations period is part of the University Calendar, and choosing to be absent for this part of assessment has consequences. 2. Exchange students who are studying at Monash and need to return to their home country by particular dates for their home institution may be granted special consideration, provided sufficient supporting documentation is provided. 3. If travel is a part of some other documented “serious cause” such as family bereavement, this may be sufficient grounds for special consideration. Process

Students must complete a special consideration form and attach all appropriate documentation to the application. It is the duty of the student to source the documentation. The form should be lodged at the Arts Faculty at either Caulfield or Clayton. Students will be advised by the Arts Faculty of the outcome of their application. Plagiarism Policy Written assessment is an essential part of the learning process and a vital medium through which we can assess your understanding of the unit. Written assessment must therefore be your own work.

This does not mean that you should not make extensive use of the work of others. However, when you use quotations or paraphrase the explanations of others, you must acknowledge your sources in full including those from the internet. You may seek the help of your lecturer in preparing the written assessment and might enlist the help of other students in sorting out your ideas but the written assessment must be written by you in your own words. Plagiarism is a very serious matter. Plagiarism occurs when students fail to acknowledge that ideas have been borrowed.

Specifically, it occurs when: (a)phrases and passages are used verbatim without quotation marks and without a reference to the author; (b)an author’s work is paraphrased and presented without a reference; (c)other students’ essays are copied; (d)work written in conjunction with other students (without prior permission); (e)work has already been submitted for assessment in another course. The Faculty of Arts Plagiarism policy can be found at http://www. arts. monash. edu. au/current/policy/plagiarism_policy. html If you have any questions regarding this please contact your unit co-ordinator.

The Monash University Library has a tutorial for students regarding plagiarism. We encourage students to access it at:http://www. lib. monash. edu/tutorials/citing/plagiarism. html Process Plagiarism is an attempt to secure a degree under false pretences. Students found guilty of plagiarism will be dealt with in the following ways: 1. They will receive no marks at all for the piece of work that has been plagiarised. 2. They will be given the opportunity explain their plagiarism to the unit co-ordinator who then may refer the matter to the Head of

Section. 3. On the basis of these discussions a decision will be made as to whether the student should be reported to the Dean in accordance with Faculty policy. Review and Remarking of Student work Policy and Process All failed work worth 30% or more of the total mark for a subject is automatically reviewed by another staff member on a pass/fail basis before the work is returned, except for forms of assessment that do not involve significant academic judgement (such as multiple-choice tests).

A student can seek to have a piece of assessment reviewed or remarked in accordance with Faculty policy (see http://www. arts. monash. edu. au/current/policy/remarking-policy. html). Such requests need to be made in writing and explain the reasons why the request is being made. The time limit for student requests for remarking or review of work is normally 4 weeks. Students should be warned that both review and remarking may result in a lower mark than the one originally awarded.

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