Research for Design Technique

Research A Good Design Technique For Integrating Multimedia Into A Web Site Design. Share Your Findings Including The Type Of Multimedia And What Plug-in Is Needed For Successfully Viewing This Type Of Multimedia On A Web Site? Ads by Google * Make 3D Animation Learn How to Make Hollywood Style 3D Animation at LA Film School. www. LAFilm. edu * The Digital Media Academy OFFICIAL | Digital Media Academy | Web | Game | 3D | Film | All Ages www. DigitalMediaAcademy. org * Autodesk Maya 2011 30-Day Trial – Autodesk Maya 2011 Professional 3D Animation Software Autodesk. om/Maya Flash is the most widely used multimedia platform for web sites. You can use Flash for music, videos, and animations. Entire interactive web sites can be constructed using Flash. There are a number of tools for creating and editing flash content. There are lots of free Flash elements available for creating image galleries, jukeboxes, and videos. Flash uses ActionScript which is basically a compiled version of JavaScript. Besides the Adobe Flash package there are third party applications for creating Flash content like Swift 3D, and Swish…

Checkout them at: http://www. swishzone. com/index. php http://www. erain. com/ http://flowplayer. org/ One cool thing that Flash does is that it will stream audio and video from your site without have a dedicated media server. Free Flash components: http://www. flashcomponents. net/components/free_flash_files. html If you decide to get into it, you’ll probably want to check out some training videos from Lynda. com or Total Training. Besides Adobe, a book company with a lot of great training materials is Friends of ED. At lot of online material is free. ttp://www. lynda. com/ http://www. totaltraining. com/ http://www. friendsofed. com/ That should give you some ideas. Let me know what you think. There are other routes you can take, but Flash is probably the most versatile. Design (de`sign? ): the act of working out the form of something; an arrangement scheme; a decorative or artistic work; the creation of something in the mind “You can design for all of the people some of the time. You can design for some of the people all of the time. But you can’t design for all of the people all of the time. (William Hudson with apologies to Abraham Lincoln) Many elements go into successful Web site design; we can cluster those elements into sensory, conceptual, and reactive aspects. That is, design isn’t only what you see, it’s also what you think and feel as you navigate a Web site. You’ve been charged with a task. Design a Web site that will cause the world to beat a path to its door (URL). While you need to consider the business aspect of the site, you also need to consider the look and the feel of the site … that is the design.

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Remember, you are a Web site “designer”, not a Web site “fabricator”. You don’t need to be a Van Gogh or a Rembrandt. You only need to understand what is behind the business end of the site. This section explores some of the basic principles of Web site design, and provides many links to other resources for further detailed study. There are articles here that will help you consider the design and usability of the site, as well as the internationalization of your client’s site. Remember, the Web is international; therefore, so is your client’s Web site.

Beyond Borders: Web Globalization Strategies – Part 2 New Riders October 14, 2002 This weeks installment concludes our look at “Internationalization and Localization” with a look at three questions you should ask yourself: “Do users understand your site? “, “Can they find what they’re looking for? ” and “Can they purchase what they find? “Beyond Borders: Web Globalization Strategies New Riders October 7, 2002 The two terms most critical to the success of web globalization—internationalization and localization—are also the two most frequently misunderstood.

This chapter will help you not only differentiate between the two, but also understand how to successfully use them together. Integrated Web Design: Building the New Breed of Designer & Developer New Riders September 27, 2002 Integrated Web Design steps the designer through the process of integrating technical and design practices in order to deepen their understanding of the how and whys of technology both inside and outside the realm of web design. With this deeper understanding, web site builders will be able to apply more integrated design practices to their everyday work.

Train of Thoughts – Designing the Effective Web Experience New Riders June 21, 2002 In Train of Thoughts—Designing the Effective Web Experience, Web strategy and design consultant John Lenker provides insight for how. This book is non-technical and is written not only for Web designers and developers, but also for any stakeholder in a Web enterprise that has a vested interest in ensuring that their online resources become more meaningful and valuable. Usability: the Site Speaks For Itself – Part 3 glasshaus

June 12, 2002 This chapter is all about the various iterations and versions of The SynFonts site and downloadable type catalogs the author has created over the years. The aim is to show you how you can learn from your mistakes, if you’re willing to constantly question yourself and your work, and make sure each iteration of a project is more and more usable. This weeks installment covers the 1998-2000 Web Site and the temporary closing of the site. Usability: the Site Speaks For Itself – Part 2 glasshaus June 5, 2002

This chapter is all about the various iterations and versions of The SynFonts site and downloadable type catalogs the author has created over the years. The aim is to show you how you can learn from your mistakes, if you’re willing to constantly question yourself and your work, and make sure each iteration of a project is more and more usable. This weeks installment covers the 1996 website and the 1997 Web Site and Interactive Catalog. Usability: the Site Speaks For Itself glasshaus May 29, 2002 37. 8% of all Usability Pundits are wrong.

That’s about as accurate as any other sweeping generalization made by any other web usability guru. “Usability: the Site Speaks For Itself” features case-studies in usability and information architecture from the makers of eBay, the BBC news on-line site, The Economist web site, SynFonts (a flash-driven font foundry e- commerce site), evolt (fully cross-browser compatible) and metafilter. The toughest site you will ever build Lee Creek February 25, 2002 Where to start? What to include? What to do? Are these common questions among web developers? Only when designing their own site.

Lee Creek offers developers some advice for when the site they’re building is their own. Back to the User: Creating User-Focused Web Sites – Part 2 New Riders Publishing February 7, 2002 This final installment shows you how to make sure your design is in service to your concept and includes a bit of admonishment to tell the truth up- front. By teaching those that create Web sites how to think like the people who use them, Back to the User enables Web marketers and developers to create sites that people want to, and can successfully, use. Back to the User: Creating User-Focused Web Sites New Riders Publishing

January 31, 2002 By teaching those that create Web sites how to think like the people who use them, Back to the User enables Web marketers and developers to create sites that people want to, and can successfully, use. This first installment covers the homepage, credentials, and using space wisely. Hot Text: Web Writing that Works: Chapter 5-Part 2 New Riders Publishing January 25, 2002 This last installment discusses vital but tangential or supplemental material, moving repeating categories of information into tables, charts, or graphs, and includes a few sites for your critique.

This book will show you how to craft prose that grabs your guests’ attention, changes their attitudes, and convinces them to act. You’ll learn how to make your style fast, tight, and scannable. Hot Text: Web Writing that Works: Chapter 5-Part 1 New Riders Publishing January 18, 2002 This next installment discusses methods of keeping the text short for online articles. Sections included in this excerpt include “Save The Meaning, Cut Away The Rest” and “Delete Marketing Fluff”. This book will show you how to craft prose that grabs your guests’ attention, changes their attitudes, and convinces them to act.

You’ll learn how to make your style fast, tight, and scannable. Hot Text: Web Writing that Works: Chapter 1-Part 2 New Riders Publishing January 11, 2002 In this installment we look at how to customize and personalize content, develop an attitude, and talk on the user’s level. This book will show you how to craft prose that grabs your guests’ attention, changes their attitudes, and convinces them to act. You’ll learn how to make your style fast, tight, and scannable. Ten Top Sites Compared Andrew Starling January 7, 2002 As Web design become more of a science and less driven by inspired guesswork, the Web’s top sites are converging.

Already they share many design features. Through analysing this convergence we can come up with a set of ‘best practice’ guidelines. Hot Text: Web Writing that Works: Chapter 1-Part 1 New Riders Publishing January 4, 2002 This book will show you how to craft prose that grabs your guests’ attention, changes their attitudes, and convinces them to act. You’ll learn how to make your style fast, tight, and scannable. This first installment looks at how to discover who you are really talking to. Usability and HTML Forms Andrew Starling December 10, 2001 Visitors don’t enjoy filling out HTML forms.

That makes good usability doubly important. Here’s a detailed look at forms for e-commerce — individual form elements such as dropdown boxes and radio buttons, plus validation and error messages. Fresh Styles for Web Designers: Eye Candy from the Underground New Riders Publishing November 9, 2001 This book introduces the reader to new ways of styling Web sites. Specific examples provides a wealth of techniques for the designer who wishes to apply these approaches in their own work. This excerpt is Chapter 4, “Lo-Fi Grunge Style”. E-commerce and Usability Andrew Starling November 5, 2001

Ease of use is central to the success of any e-commerce site. You need a shopping cart that mirrors the supermarket experience, and a checkout sequence that keeps the customer in full control of the transaction. That sense of control across all aspects of your site is essential if you want to provide the best shopping experience. Andrew Starling looks at the details. Design for Community: Part 2 New Riders Publishing October 25, 2001 In this second (and final) installment, we look at the job description of a host. Also included is an interview with Caleb Clark, who has played host to countless communities over the last five years.

Design for Community goes beyond the basic how-to of programming Web features to actually dissecting the purposes and best ways to implement those features to foster a real, productive online community. Design for Community: Part 1 New Riders Publishing October 18, 2001 Design for Community goes beyond the basic how-to of programming Web features to actually dissecting the purposes and best ways to implement those features to foster a real, productive online community. This is the first excerpt from Chapter 5. This installment covers setting, communicating, and enforcing the rules. Usability and Navigation Andrew Starling

October 8, 2001 Ever given up on a site because it’s too difficult to get around? It’s a silly way to lose visitors. In this article Andrew looks at how you can set up internal links so your visitors can move from page to page with ease. Building Web Sites From Start to Finish Lee Creek September 25, 2001 With the many tools available to web site builders these days, the actual construction of the site is often the easiest part of the process. The hard part is getting to that point, and that requires more than a little planning. Usability – the Basics Andrew Starling September 10, 2001

Want to impress your visitors? Forget the fancy graphics and neat technical tricks, just choose the right page width and hyperlink colors. Here’s a basic introduction to the science of usability, drawing on research, expert opinion, and common features from the Web’s most popular sites. Design and Architecture of a Content-Rich Web Site: Part 2 Alan Richmond August 23, 2001 Information architecture is the practice of designing the infrastructure of a Web site. In the conclusion of this article, Alan covers accessibility and usability, the home page as site map, and compromising between too little and too much.

Design and Architecture of a Content-Rich Web Site Alan Richmond August 20, 2001 Information architecture is the practice of designing the infrastructure of a Web site, a combination of organizing a site’s content into categories and creating a navigation interface to support those categories. Web Sites: Learn to Build Smart and Buy Smart Lee Creek July 31, 2001 Building and buying Web sites should be a rewarding experience for both builder and buyer. For that to happen, though, the builder needs to make sure the buyer is getting honest value by using professional tools and professional methods.

Further, buyers should insist on getting their money’s worth. Designing Web Usability: Part 7 New Riders Publishing June 22, 2001 What is the best way to handle user-contributed content? How about applet navigation? In this last installment, Jakob Nielsen covers these issues as they apply to the design and usability of Web sites. This is the seventh installment of Chapter 4, excerpted from Designing Web Usability. Designing Web Usability: Part 6 New Riders Publishing June 15, 2001 Does it really matter how you list the URL of your site? You bet! In this installment, Jakob Nielsen covers URL design and how to support old URLs.

This is the sixth installment of Chapter 4, excerpted from Designing Web Usability. Don’t Make Me Think! A Common Sense Approach to Web Usability New Riders Publishing June 14, 2001 Find out how people really look at your Web site. This book is for the people in the trenches — the designers, the programmers, the webmasters, the project managers, the marketing people and the folks who sign the checks. Designing Web Usability: Part 5 New Riders Publishing June 8, 2001 This installment covers searches on the Web site and the Internet. This is the fifth installment of Chapter 4, excerpted from Designing Web Usability.

Designing Web Usability: Part 4 New Riders Publishing May 25, 2001 This installment covers navigation aids and helps to give understanding of how to help the visitor work his way around the site. This is the fourth installment of Chapter 4, excerpted from Designing Web Usability. Designing Web Usability: Part 3 New Riders Publishing May 18, 2001 This installment covers navigation on the site. How does the visitor know where he is, where he is going, or even where he has been? This is the third installment of Chapter 4, excerpted from Designing Web Usability. Designing Web Usability: Part 2 New Riders Publishing

May 11, 2001 This installment looks at the difference between the home page and interior pages. In addition, the use of the metaphor in the home page is examined. This is the second installment of Chapter 4, excerpted from Designing Web Usability. Designing Web Usability: Part 1 New Riders Publishing May 4, 2001 From content and page design to designing for ease of navigation and users with disabilities, Jakob Nielsen delivers complete direction on how to connect with any Web user, in any situation. This is the first installment of Chapter 4, excerpted from Designing Web Usability.

Table Talk WebDeveloper. com October 20, 2000 The use of tables is a perfect example that just by learning and utilizing the lesser-used capabilities of HTML, we can yield some impressive results. Designing Web Sites to be Disability Friendly Lisa Seeman September 8, 2000 Over 15% of the population have a learning disability (LD). In addition, a sizable percentage of the population is physically challenged or has related problems. Making your page accessible means bearing in mind that not all of the visitors to your Web site will be viewing it on a monitor and navigating with a mouse.

A clear, well-formatted site, with easy words, can make it easier on everyone. Read on to learn more… How to Build Web Sites with Free Stuff – Yet More Stuff Alan Richmond March 6, 2000 In this fifth and final article in the Free Stuff series, we will look at sites that offer multiple services such as Website Tools Providers, Community Interaction, Scripts and Applets, and an assortment of items that didn’t seem to fit anywhere else. How To Build A Web Site with Free Stuff – Syndicated Content Alan Richmond January 24, 2000

Ever wish you could have daily updates to your site with little or no work on your part? Now you can! Learn how to add News Headlines, Cartoons, Tips, Weather and Stock Quotes that update on a regular basis without having to update them yourself, and the best part… it’s free! How To Build a Web Site with Free Stuff Part 3: Games and Puzzles Alan Richmond December 27, 1999 In this third part of our series on free stuff to build Web sites with, we look at ways to entertain your visitors. Whether your site is about entertainment or not -your visitors might welcome a few moments of light relief!

Perhaps some fun games to play, or a tricky puzzle or maze to solve… Designing for Net Devices Scott Clark November 22, 1999 Today’s Internet not only includes those browsing from their desktop or laptop, but those surfing with WebTV, Palmpilots, cellphones and other net- connected devices. In the first part of this series about designing for net devices, we’re going to show you how to create a page that looks good in both a Web browser and Web TV, along with the code required to detect the WebTV browser using both JavaScript and Perl.

How To Build a Web Site with Free Stuff 2: Graphics Alan Richmond November 15, 1999 Design great Web sites with free applets, graphics, HTML editors and more! There’s a fair amount of free stuff available on the Web, with no strings attached! This month we’re going to show you where to get graphics, clip- art, photos, and more – all for free! How To Build a Web Site with Free Stuff Alan Richmond October 20, 1999 Design great Web sites with free applets, graphcs, HTML editors and more! There’s a fair amount of free stuff available on the Web, with no strings attached.

In this and subsequent articles, we’re going to show you where to get Web development tools, graphics, clip-art, photos, Java applets, Shockwaves, search engines, polls, surveys, news and weather, music, etc etc – all for free! Build Traffic Through Good Site Design Charlie Morris September 27, 1999 Everybody knows about Web site promotion; submitting to search engines, creating reciprocol links, banner swaps and mailing lists are necessary steps to building Web site traffic. But when all is said and done, the most important traffic-building technique of all may be site design.

Web Design – More than Meets the Eye Alan Richmond 1998 Many elements go into succesful Web site design; we can cluster those elements into sensory, conceptual, and reactive aspects. That is, design isn’t only what you see, it’s also what you think and feel as you navigate a Web site. This article explores some of the basic principles of Web site design, and provides many links to other resources for further detailed study. Page Layout, Margins, Indenting, and Columns Alan Richmond October 22, 1998 “How can I indent text? ” “How can I make newspaper-like columns? ” “How can I make margins? “How can I position graphics? “. These are all layout issues, which HTML was not originally designed to address. However, some techniques are available to solve these problems – e. g. hacks and kludges, tables, and style sheets. We explain and demonstrate them, and give links to further details. Designing Attractive Web Pages Charlie Morris February 28, 1999 A well- designed page, whether in print or on the Web, is a thing of beauty. A skilled page designer can take widely differing elements like body text, headings, graphics, links and whatever, and arrange them into a harmonious whole.

Good design is practical as well as aesthetic. Well- designed pages are easier to read, and lead your readers’ eyes where you want them to be led. This article looks strictly at the visual aspects of page design. Navigation Articles and Tutorials on designing for good Web site navigation. Multimedia for the Web Descriptions and demonstrations of the various media available for Web developers, providing sound and graphic experiences beyond the classical static images and hypertext. | |

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